BET Discriminates Against Gay-Transgender Entertainment Personality B. Scott

5 Sep

This is an outrage. BET disrespected him, the LGBT community, and even the black community. The issue that I have personally with the black community is that most of them are against their own if they discover they’re gay, even more than all the other ethnicity groups.  In fact, from my experience in family, school, and working with other black people, they are not supportive of anyone who’s different than the stereotype.

A black person likes rock music. Black Response: “Why she listening to that white people music with all that screaming?” A black male hates basketball and prefers golf, skateboarding, baseball, or swimming. Black response: All black boys should know how to play basketball. It’s “gay” not to like basketball, or just plain “white”. These are just examples I’ve been exposed to. Black people are oppressed in many areas, but black people also limit themselves from opportunities.

Imagine how many black music artists we would have if any of them tried a new genre from the stereotype? We would have more successful black artists. Imagine how many successful black stories we would have if we encouraged them to reach outside of their comfort zone?

Being transgender or gay is even more difficult. Black people are more limited in their minds when it comes to sexuality and gender roles. Sex is very important, almost too important, in the black community. Which is probably why there are so many young mothers in the black community. If someone doesn’t “fit” into that mold, they are treated as not even being a part of the community. Black people apart of the LGBT community get more love and support from other ethnicity groups than they do their own.

Recently, Raven Symone revealed that she was gay. The comments section exploded with comments like “#childhoodruined”, posted mostly by fellow African Americans. No support, just discrimination.

A black man is least likely to accept gay people. Most of the comments were by black males, and even in B. Scott’s case, men were the main trashers on blogs and comment sections. This is because the black man only thinks about sex. He has no self-control, and therefore, sees any challenge to his sexuality as a challenge to his manhood. Why is it so hard for the black man to accept someone who’s different sexually? Where does this homophobic attitude originate?

I equally see this close-mindedness from women when it comes to black people who listen to their own kind of music and dress in their own kind of clothes. Black women can’t accept someone who enjoys listening to all kinds of music or wearing all kinds of fashion.

I am not a part of the LGBT community, but I absolutely support Androgynous fashion. It is a part of me, and I enjoy the look. It’s not only daring, original, but it’s a form of expressing who I am because I have gripes with the feminine world. I am #TeamB.Scott because he embraces wearing whatever a person wants to wear. Why should certain clothes and colors be associated with women? In some cultures, men do wear skirts, and in ancient times they wore robes! So why is it strictly a woman thing to dress a certain way? Why is gender seperated when it comes to fashion?

It’s not like B. Scott came with his goods hanging out, like most other black people on the red carpet, i.e. Lil Kim. They act like he wore the most revealing and flashy outfit in the world.

I hope BET learns from this, and I hope it opens the minds of others.

People want to say that it’s because Viacom is in charge. But the supervisor was in charge, and he was black. Viacom doesn’t watch that close to the point they control everything that goes on in the network. They come when it comes to the banking. But the supervisors help the network survive so they give them full reign to supervise who they want on their network.

Black people really need to learn to open their minds, and BET better start opening their pockets.

Leave me a comment and let me know what you think about this fiasco!

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